• Perceptions, Attitudes, and Beliefs of Young, Underrepresented Minorities in Clinical Trials

      Ross, Allison; Wong, U.; Nguyen, J. (2021)
      Introduction:This study is designed to ask Millennials (1981-1996) and early Generation Zers (1997-2002) about their perceptions of clinical trials. This will provide insight to identify reasons for the lack of diversity in age, ethnicity, and background for the advancement of future medicine. Methods:The data provided evaluated Millennials and Generation Zers using a survey. Participants were recruited via convenience sampling. Questions included personal demographics, knowledge of clinical trials, willingness to participate in clinical trials. Results:A chi-square test was performed to examine potential associations between individual demographics and responses(N=172, Minority=126, Male=37.7%). For the likelihood of participating in vaccine-focused clinical trials, 62.4% of the respondents reported that it would be unlikely for them to participate in a study; 76.9% Millennials versus Gen Z (N=125, p=0.009). When analyzing gender, women were found to be 69.5% more likely than men to deny participating in a clinical trial for vaccines (N=81, p=0.0005). Discussion:In regard to participating in a clinical trial with a focus on vaccinations, Millennials were less likely to indicate participation than Gen Zers. Between both generations, females were most opposed to the concept. Increased representation in gender and minority-based ethnicity (significantly in the Hispanic and/or Asian community) will allow more comprehensive insight for future implementation and analysis.