• A Narrative Inquiry of Work-Life Balance Among Faculty Mothers in Higher Education

      Riley, Lozarie; Tift College of Education
      Despite women outnumbering men as doctoral degree recipients, women remain underrepresented in higher education leadership roles. Specifically, women at the childbearing age serving as faculty often face challenges such as inadequate maternity leave and family policies that impede pathways for tenure, promotion, and elevation to senior administration. As such, the aim of this study was to explore the work-life balance experiences related to maternity leave and/or family policies of female employees on the path to higher education leadership. To address the research questions of this study, the researcher utilized narrative inquiry to capture the stories of four faculty mothers who gave birth and took a maternity leave period while working to earn tenure. Women’s Ways of Knowing theory served as a framework to understand how participants made sense of their experience. Through core story creation, developed by Polkinghorne (1988) and further extended by Emden (1998), narrative analysis of the stories resulted in a narrative specific to each participant, as well as a narrative of the faculty mother work-life balance culture. Four themes emerged that offer recommendations to advance the faculty mother work-life balance experience: Mentorship, Support to Return to Work After Leave, Advancing Leave Policies, and Work-Life Balance. The findings of this study implied that faculty mothers are disadvantaged by the Family Medical Leave Act, while desiring the creation of university level leave policies specific to pregnancy and motherhood. Recommendations for future studies include qualitative and quantitative study designs.
    • Satisfaction and Work-Life Balance in Undergraduate Nursing Faculty: A Mixed-Methods Study

      Crawford, Ryan Patricia; Georgia Baptist College of Nursing
      The current nursing and nursing faculty shortages are related, multifactorial problems. The nursing faculty shortage impedes the current demands to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared nurses. Important concepts, which could impair recruitment and retention of nursing faculty, include job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance. These concepts could be impacted by certain demographics. The purpose of this study was to better understand the gender, generational, and racial differences of job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance in baccalaureate nursing faculty. This study incorporated a convergent parallel mixed-methods study design to assess job, satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance of baccalaureate nursing faculty of differing genders, generational cohorts, and races. A total of 370 full-time, baccalaureate nursing faculty members participated in one web-based survey. Quantitative data were collected using four instruments: a demographic questionnaire, the Work-Life Balance Self-Assessment, the Job Satisfaction Survey, and the Satisfaction with Life Survey. Qualitative data were collected using open-ended questions. Within the quantitative findings, significant differences were identified with minority faculty reporting less job and life satisfaction. Gender differences were also identified in satisfaction levels. Both findings have practical significance as there are increased calls to diversify the nursing workforce and faculty. Qualitative data analysis revealed the themes Relationship with Administration, Nursing Faculty Workload, and Boundary-setting. These themes presented a dichotomy in subthemes relating to the concerns of the nursing faculty members. Generational differences were seen among the qualitative findings, which included one theme for Generation X and Millennial cohorts Family Life, with varying subthemes for the generations. The findings of the quantitative and qualitative strands were similar for work-life balance regarding the bimodality noted in the quantitative strand and the dichotomy of subthemes within the qualitative strand. The findings from this study have the potential to provide a better understanding of work-life balance among full-time, baccalaureate nursing faculty members. Recommendations for nursing based on these findings include thoughtful workload calculations, mentoring, faculty development, and administrator development. The findings from this study could guide further research, which is needed to identify the unique experiences of faculty who identify as male or from a minority race.