• Impact of Spirituality on Occupational Success of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

      Pegues, Sir Allen Dupree; College of Professional Advancement
      ABSTRACT SIR ALLEN D. PEGUES IMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY ON OCCUPATIONAL SUCCESS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY Under the direction of SUNEETHA MANYAM, PhD The literature findings indicate that individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are less likely to obtain employment than people without disabilities. Challenges such as resiliency, spirituality, level of education, and the severity of the injury contribute to their lack of employment. Individuals with SCI should have the same opportunity to achieve occupational success as persons without disabilities. This study was designed to explore the following question: What impact does spirituality have on the occupational success of individuals with SCI? The researcher used the Spiritual Well-Being Scale and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale to measure each participant’s level of resiliency and spirituality. Convenience sampling was used to collect data from 117 SCI individuals who responded to a Qualtrics survey. The data were analyzed using the ANOVA procedure to gain an understanding of how the independent variables impacted the occupational success of individuals with SCI. The results revealed that resiliency and level of education had a statistically significant impact on occupational success of individuals with SCI. Individuals with SCI with higher spirituality scores did not have as much occupational success as those with lower spirituality scores. Individuals with more education had more occupational success than individuals with SCI with less education. The severity of the injury did not have a statistically significant impact on occupational success of individuals with SCI.
    • The Lived Experiences of Black Families Surviving Child Sexual Abuse by Known Perpetrators

      Dunkley, Danielle Ilene; College of Professional Advancement
      Child sexual abuse (CSA) within Black communities is understudied. Most studies have focused on quantitative data studying the psychological consequences of CSA. Furthermore, many studies do not explore the experience of Black CSA survivors of known perpetrators. This study used interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to interview Black adults who have been sexually abused in their childhood by individuals within their family or who were closely associated with their family. Using semi-structured interviews, participants were asked to share about their experience as a CSA victim, their disclosure process, coping strategies, and the impact of CSA by known perpetrators on their family system. This study used Spaccarelli’s (1994) transactional framework for understanding CSA outcomes. The transactional framework for studying how Black families experience CSA by known perpetrators highlight particular dynamics within Black families that contribute to the propagation of CSA, disclosure or nondisclosure of CSA, its impact on the Black family system, as well as cognitive appraisals and coping strategies utilized by this population. The research findings inform prevention and treatment efforts within Black communities. Findings of this study are specific to the participant group and are not generalizable to all Black families or survivors of CSA. Future research should seek to identify strategies for preventing CSA, eliminating barriers to disclosure, reducing negative impacts of CSA, and increasing resiliency within Black communities.