• Mapping Internationalization at Community Colleges in the United States: Development and Validation of a Short Form of the American Council on Education Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses Instrument

      Lewis, Ashwin; Tift College of Education
      The primary purpose of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the American Council on Education Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses instrument (the Mappings instrument) so that it can be used to measure internationalization at community colleges in the United States. A secondary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between community college internationalization and the institutional characteristics of control, minority-serving, and urbanicity so that the results can inform the internationalization strategy of the community college. These three institutional characteristics, as defined by IPEDS, were identified in the latest 2016 ACE Mappings survey. The community colleges’ responses to ACE 2016 Mappings instrument were dichotomized and quantified. The instrument development process followed that of Spector (1992). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze and validate the short form of the Mappings instrument. The final solution was verified using categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). The frequency distributions were categorized using the Sawilowsky et al. (1990) distribution types. The principal component analysis (PCA) process reduced the ACE Mappings instrument to 17 items while maintaining 72.04% of the information. The PCA process described internationalization as a five-dimensional construct. Cronbach reliability coefficient alpha (α) alpha was used to check the reliability of the short form. The Cronbach coefficient alpha (α) of the five dimensions ranged from .68 to .92. The corrected item-total correlations were all above .3. The distribution were all non-normal. Two types of Sawilovsky et al. (1990) distributions were identified. Using the frequency distributions, this study developed two types of norming strategies. The results of the study showed that there was a relationship between community college internationalization and the institutional characteristics of control, minority-serving, and urbanicity. Private not-for-profit community colleges scored the highest in three of the five dimensions with private for-profit community colleges scoring the highest in the remaining two dimensions. Minority-serving community colleges scored the highest in all of the dimensions except for the curriculum internationalization dimension. Community colleges situated in the city scored the highest in all of the dimensions except for the curriculum internationalization dimension.