• Factors Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risks in Black Women Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) or Coronary Bypass Graft (CABG) Procedures: A Retrospective Correlational Study

      Sutton, Paula Renee; Georgia Baptist College of Nursing
      Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death among adults in the United States (US) with a high prevalence among Black women. Black women have higher incidences of known CVD risks and higher CVD-related mortality than women of other races. To reduce CVD risks, factors associated with CVD risks should be investigated. Although some sociodemographic, biophysiological or physical, and psychological factors have been found to be associated with CVD risks, the associations of these factors with each CVD risk have been rarely examined in Black women. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of CVD risks (smoking, obesity, HTN, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and alcohol use) and the associations of sociodemographic (i.e., age and health insurance payor), biophysiological/physical (i.e., metabolic/infectious/autoimmune [MIAs] conditions [kidney disease, thyroid disease, hepatitis, and systemic lupus erythematous] and antihypertensive/antidiabetic/lipid-lowering medication use), and psychological (i.e., depression) factors with each of the CVD risks in Black women who had percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft procedures. In this retrospective, correlational study, variable data were collected from a convenience sample of 137 Black women (mean age: 64 years) based on electronic health records (EHRs) of a large healthcare system. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression using the Enter method were used to analyze the data and address the purpose of the study. Participants had a mean of 3.6 total CVD risks. There was high prevalence of hypertension (95.6%), hyperlipidemia (95.6%), and obesity (59.1%). Those with MIAs (p = .010) or on lipid-lowering medications (p = .020) were less likely to smoke. Participants on antidiabetic medication were more likely to be obese (p = .013). Older age was associated with hypertension (p = .024). Antidiabetic medication use was associated with diabetes (p <.001) and lipid-lowering medication was associated with hyperlipidemia (p = .029). No factors were associated with alcohol use. Further studies are needed to examine the relationships of those factors used in this study in larger sample studies with prospective, longitudinal study designs. Then, development and delivery of interventions targeting those factors affecting CVD risks are needed for Black women with multiple CVD risks.
    • Satisfaction and Work-Life Balance in Undergraduate Nursing Faculty: A Mixed-Methods Study

      Crawford, Ryan Patricia; Georgia Baptist College of Nursing
      The current nursing and nursing faculty shortages are related, multifactorial problems. The nursing faculty shortage impedes the current demands to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared nurses. Important concepts, which could impair recruitment and retention of nursing faculty, include job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance. These concepts could be impacted by certain demographics. The purpose of this study was to better understand the gender, generational, and racial differences of job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance in baccalaureate nursing faculty. This study incorporated a convergent parallel mixed-methods study design to assess job, satisfaction, life satisfaction, and work-life balance of baccalaureate nursing faculty of differing genders, generational cohorts, and races. A total of 370 full-time, baccalaureate nursing faculty members participated in one web-based survey. Quantitative data were collected using four instruments: a demographic questionnaire, the Work-Life Balance Self-Assessment, the Job Satisfaction Survey, and the Satisfaction with Life Survey. Qualitative data were collected using open-ended questions. Within the quantitative findings, significant differences were identified with minority faculty reporting less job and life satisfaction. Gender differences were also identified in satisfaction levels. Both findings have practical significance as there are increased calls to diversify the nursing workforce and faculty. Qualitative data analysis revealed the themes Relationship with Administration, Nursing Faculty Workload, and Boundary-setting. These themes presented a dichotomy in subthemes relating to the concerns of the nursing faculty members. Generational differences were seen among the qualitative findings, which included one theme for Generation X and Millennial cohorts Family Life, with varying subthemes for the generations. The findings of the quantitative and qualitative strands were similar for work-life balance regarding the bimodality noted in the quantitative strand and the dichotomy of subthemes within the qualitative strand. The findings from this study have the potential to provide a better understanding of work-life balance among full-time, baccalaureate nursing faculty members. Recommendations for nursing based on these findings include thoughtful workload calculations, mentoring, faculty development, and administrator development. The findings from this study could guide further research, which is needed to identify the unique experiences of faculty who identify as male or from a minority race.