• Development of Microencapsulated Formulations for Prostate Cancer Vaccine and Live Cells

      Akalkotkar, Archana; College of Pharmacy
      In the current trend, novel particle based platform technology has paved its way to various therapeutic benefits in our lives. In this study, we explored the way of harnessing this technology in order to formulate effective vaccines in the quest for mass immunization in a cost-effective manner. Here we propose a custom formulation of vaccines, which will render effects of sustained release, site specificity and cost-effective delivery of various antigens to enhance the immunity. We used the novel nano-micro technology based of Spray drying as a platform to deliver vaccines against Prostate cancer and encapsulated live cells. In this study, we formulated a whole cell lysate vaccine against prostate cancer via oral and transdermal route of administration. The formulation intended for oral adminstration was optimized for M-cell targeting, The formulation increased the immunogenicity of the vaccine by incorporating the antigen into an albumin matrix having a size of around 0.35-1.2 um that acted as a synthetic adjuvant. The animals were vaccinated with 1 prime and 4 booster doses administered every 14 days over 10 weeks duration, followed by challenge with live tumor cells which showed protection after oral vaccination. Unlike subcutaneous injections, administration-using microneedles is painless and in general can increase the permeability of many compounds ranging in size from small molecules to proteins and microparticles that do not normally penetrate the skin. The mice vaccinated via transdermal route showed promising results in delaying the tumor growth compared to the controls. The study was extrapolated in a therapeutic approach. This would mimic the real clinical scenario where the patient who was diagnosed with prostate cancer would come in the clinic for immunotherapy. The microparticle based delivery system showed protection in vaccinated group compared to the controls. This shows the microparticle based delivery system can be an useful tool for delivery as well as live cells in vivo.