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dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Cha'Ke'Sha
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-29T13:08:09Z
dc.date.available2024-05-29T13:08:09Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10898/13887
dc.description2024
dc.description.abstractCHA’KE’SHA SPENCER YOU CAN’T POUR FROM AN EMPTY CUP: A PHENEMENOLOGICAL STUDY EXPLORING EXPERIENCES OF BLACK COUNSELOR WELLNESS PRACTICES AND BARRIERS TO WELLNESS Under the direction of MORGAN E. K. RIECHEL, PHD Myers et al., (2000) define wellness as “a way of life oriented toward optimal health and well- being in which body, mind, and spirit are integrated by the individual to live more fully within the human and natural community.” Occupational hazards such as burnout, compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and the COVID-19 pandemic may contribute to counselors’ vulnerability regarding a lack of wellness practices (Blount et al., 2016). Black counselors face these risks and unique barriers to wellness such as racial stressors, stigma associated with mental health, and cultural myths and misconceptions around emotional wellness and self-care. The literature is limited regarding wellness models for Black Americans and the theoretical framework for this study does not focus on one model, instead explores several traditional wellness models including those that center cultural relevance. The Strong Black Woman Schema and John Henryism concepts and their relationship to Black counselor wellness practices were also explored. This qualitative study utilized Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to interview 9 practicing master and doctoral level counselors, who practice independently and identify as Black. The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experiences of Black counselors’ wellness practices and possible barriers to wellness. Results indicate that Black counselors are able to define wellness as being holistic, balancing mind, body and spirit and self- care as activities that are enjoyable and promote optimal wellness. Results also indicate that participants acknowledged their history of prioritizing work and family and treating their self- care as an afterthought, which resulted in feelings of exhaustion, guilt, being overwhelmed. Participants admitted that history and cultural beliefs played a role in how they cared for themselves, and they recognized the need for community in their wellness journey.
dc.publisherMercer University
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectHealth education
dc.subjectAfrican American, barriers to wellness, counseling, counselor, counselor education, wellness
dc.titleYou Can’t Pour From an Empty Cup: A Phenomenological Study Exploring Experiences of Black Counselor Wellness Practices and Barriers to Wellness
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2024-04-17T22:07:52Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
refterms.dateFOA2024-05-29T13:08:10Z
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Professional Advancement
dc.description.advisorKiper-Riechel, Morgan
dc.description.committeeWilkinson, R. Tyler
dc.description.committeeSutherland, Sonja
dc.description.degreeD.Phil.


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