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dc.contributor.authorCarter, Mariah J
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-29T13:07:16Z
dc.date.available2024-05-29T13:07:16Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10898/13883
dc.description2024
dc.description.abstractAs colleges and universities seek to ensure accommodating academic experiences for all students, it is becoming increasingly clear that the concepts of diversity and disability extend beyond easily identifiable conditions but must also include invisible differences. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of college students with nonidentifiable diversities to determine the extent to which institutions are meeting the full spectrum of students’ needs. Further, the study sought to determine ways in which institutional practices enhance or hinder the academic progress and success of students with nonidentifiable diversities. The research question that guided the study was, “What are the lived experiences of students with nonidentifiable diversities in higher education?” The study was conducted using interpretive phenomenological analysis. The researcher created an informational video outlining the specifics of the study, including the criteria of being at least 18 years of age and having an invisible diversity. From that video, the participants were able to scan a QR code which led them to a prequestionnaire, which signified their interest in the study. Through semi-structured interviews, eight participants revealed memories, perceptions, and insights into their educational experiences in higher education. Following the steps of interpretive phenomenological analysis, the researcher discovered four emergent themes: (a) Managing Invisible Differences, (b) Extrinsic Rejection of Invisible Differences, (c) The Scars of Invisibility, and (d) Creating a Sense of Belonging, which provided insight into how the participants navigated their invisible differences during their higher education experiences. A key implication of this research was the importance of creating an institutional culture rooted in empathy through building relationships and developing positive service quality experiences for students with nonidentifiable diversities. Creating an institutional culture not only enhances the overall educational experience but fosters a sense of belonging and improves academic success measures for students. Additionally, there exist a few gaps in research from the findings that would benefit from further research, including a need for greater comprehension of self-advocacy for students with nonidentifiable diversities along with a need to understand more about campus services and how those services can help promote equity and self-advocacy for students.
dc.publisherMercer University
dc.subjectDisability studies
dc.subjectAcademic Success, Belonging, Belonging, Culture, Diversity, Invisibilities
dc.titleRECOGNIZE MY HUMANITY: CREATING AN INSTITUTIONAL CULTURE OF EMPATHY IN HIGHER EDUCATION
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2024-04-17T22:07:46Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
refterms.dateFOA2024-05-29T13:07:17Z
dc.contributor.departmentTift College of Education
dc.description.advisorBoggs, Olivia
dc.description.committeeIsaac, Carol
dc.description.committeeWells, Christian
dc.description.degreeD.Phil.


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