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dc.contributor.authorRobleto, Moises
dc.date2021
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-02T15:23:41Z
dc.date.available2022-05-02T15:23:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10898/13578
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT (Under the direction of JEFFREY WILLETS, Ph.D.) Explicitly or implicitly and whether we like it or not, there are problems which arise when modern Christians read the Bible as a Christian text, as part of their religious practice. The focus of this study will be on the philosophical problems caused by the historical distance between the Biblical world and ours. Those problems arise when a modern lens is applied to an ancient religious text. In this thesis, I will give particular focus to the ways that conceptual confusions arise in understanding the text by providing a philosophical analysis of the concept of miracles in Mark 4:35-41 and how this Biblical account in the life of Jesus and his disciples illuminates the concept of divine authority. I will show how modern assumptions can distort readings and meanings of the text. I will also show how the reading of the text may be freed from these confused assumptions by making a philosophical assessment of the concept of miracles to support the claim of Jesus’ divinity. There are many philosophical questions to be asked about what we find in the text of Mark 4:35-41 regarding a miracle performed by Jesus and how we can ascribe sense to it as twenty-first century readers of the Bible. The stated purpose for undertaking this inquiry was to study the concept of “Divine Authority” this was accomplished by means of a thorough study of leading postmodern scholars own published writings, and lectures, giving special consideration to the work in Philosophy of Christianity by Gareth Moore. How are we to understand the story of Jesus calming a storm? Such writings tended and clarified what we find in the story of a Storm Stilled. The story is not told in causal terms, it is not a matter of cause and effect, in fact, the story is told as one simple command and nature obeys. And so in this essay I respond to the disciples question, not “How did he do it” but, the real question, “What sort of a man is this, that even the winds and sea obey him?”
dc.publisherMercer University
dc.subjectReligious history
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectMcAfee School of Theology
dc.titleHow A Philosophical Assessment of the Text of Mark 4:34-41 Illuminates an Understanding of Divine Authority in the Person of Jesus
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2022-04-28T16:04:40Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
refterms.dateFOA2022-05-02T15:23:42Z
dc.contributor.departmentMcAfee School of Theology
dc.description.advisorWilletts , Jeffery
dc.description.committeeWilletts, Jeffery
dc.description.committeedeClaissé-Walford,, Nancy
dc.description.committeeMassey, Karen
dc.description.committeeDeLoach, Greg
dc.description.degreeM.T.S.


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