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dc.contributor.advisorDowling, Abigail
dc.contributor.authorMaylock, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-03T14:00:21Z
dc.date.available2021-05-03T14:00:21Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10898/12670
dc.description.abstractOne thing that everyone believes they know about ancient Rome is that the Christians faced persecution during this time. The treatment, or mistreatment, of the early Christians stems from a larger wave of xenophobia occurring in Rome in and around the first century. Remnants of this wave are present in the writings of the time, despite the common conception that once the Romans conquered a people, those people would be effortlessly absorbed by the Empire. This common misconception is spurred on by the Pax Romana, or Roman Peace, a term referring to the time of relative peace under the Roman Empire. The peace was held with military control and taxation of the Roman territories. Despite being at peace, Roman citizens, especially the ones living in the city of Rome, thought of themselves as better than the provincial citizens and outsiders. This Roman Xenophobia encapsulated dislike not just towards foreign groups, but also foreign ideologies. This paper will explore how xenophobia in Rome affected different groups, and where it was present in literary works. In addition, it will take a look at Christianity as seen by the Romans and show how it falls into the category of xenophobia and not religious persecution.
dc.titleXenophobia in Rome and how it affected the early Christians
dc.typePresentation
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-03T14:00:21Z


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