• Spaciotemporal analysis of COVID-19 to study impact of mobility on infection rate

      Hamza, Syed Ali; Bukhari, Syeda Sydra; Chandio, Sara Khan; Khan, Shakeel (2021)
      Background: COVID-19’s asymptomatic nature in some people makes it undetectable in initial days of contact and results in spread of the infection. Some countries have contained its spread, whereas some are still experiencing increasing cases. This study includes spaciotemporal analysis of COVID-19 and mobility data to provide insights in how the infection spreads while comparing the public mobility between the best and worst performing countries. Study Design/Method: The data about cases, recoveries, and deaths from Jan ’20 to Feb ’21 from John Hopkins-CSE is integrated with mobility data from Google. It is then analyzed at global level with further drilldowns into continent, countries, and states in US. Study includes comparative analysis between US and New Zealand to show which mobility parameters influenced the spread. Locations such as transit stations, retail, grocery, workspaces, residential areas, and parks were studied to find their impact. Findings: The analysis indicates that there was a short-term drop in mobility around workplaces, retail and grocery stores, and transit stores in United States along with a spike in the mobility across parks during the initial period. On the other hand, mobility has been under control in New Zealand. The study highlights that the areas with higher public activity shows higher infection rate, thus controlling the public movement around retail and grocery places has positive influence than complete shutdown of the workplaces.